ironSource https://www.ironsrc.com Mon, 23 Jul 2018 09:49:05 +0000 en-EU hourly 1 Hyper-Casual Games: What Are They & How do You Monetize Them? https://www.ironsrc.com/news/what-are-hyper-casual-games-and-how-do-you-monetize-them/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/what-are-hyper-casual-games-and-how-do-you-monetize-them/#respond Sun, 22 Jul 2018 11:45:11 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30795 What are Hyper-Casual Games & How do you Monetize them? Since the App store surfaced 10 years ago, we have seen mid-core, casual, and (debatably) hard-core games take off in the mobile space, yet today a fourth category is dominating the app charts – hyper-casual. Over the past year, hyper-casual games have seen unprecedented growth,... Read more »

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What are Hyper-Casual Games & How do you Monetize them?

Since the App store surfaced 10 years ago, we have seen mid-core, casual, and (debatably) hard-core games take off in the mobile space, yet today a fourth category is dominating the app charts – hyper-casual. Over the past year, hyper-casual games have seen unprecedented growth, and with Goldman Sachs’ recent 200M investment in hyper-casual powerhouse Voodoo , their momentum is only getting stronger.

So what exactly makes these games so successful? And where do we see hyper-casual going? Here’s our complete guide on the fast ascendance of hyper-casual games, and a look at how best to monetize them.

What are Hyper-Casual Games?

As the name suggests, hyper-casual games are lightweight games with simple mechanics that offer instant gameplay. Literally “tap to play.”

Because of their fundamental ‘simplicity,’ hyper-casual games are not only instantly playable but infinitely replayable, making them highly addictive and engaging. Think – how many hours have you spent playing Sky Ball this week? (be honest).

The combination of simple mechanics with minimalistic UI provides a very accessible and incredibly engaging user experience, so no tutorial is necessary. Even more so than casual games, players can instantly jump into gameplay and get hooked on their goal.

The Ascendance of Hyper-Casual Games: where did they come from?

Hyper-casual games aren’t exactly “new”, especially in the sense that they are, in some ways, a revival of 70s arcade games. However, as we can see from the charts pictured below, they only recently grew into the sensation they are today, grabbing 10 out of the top 15 spots in the top downloaded charts, versus a year ago when they held a ‘mere’ 3 spots on the top charts.

March 2017

May 2018


The ascendance of hyper-casual games can be credited to a number of things, from the way these games are able to fill an emerging gap in the gaming space, to advancements in ad monetization.

“As casual games implement deeper, mid-core features they become more engaging, but also more complicated. This, in turn, opens up a segment for hyper-casual games to dominate – games that are easy to start and fun to play,” said Deconstructor of Fun founder and Rovio’s Director of Product Management, Mishka Katkoff in his interview with ironSource LevelUp. “Hyper-casual games were pioneered back with Ketchapp years ago, but this year has seen a resurgence with companies like Voodoo, Gram, BitMango, and Cheetah all seeing massive growth within the last year.”

IAP Revenue vs. Scale Across Game Genres

Although hyper-casual games are dominating the download charts, games like Playgendary’s Flip the Gun still can’t compete with Clash of Clans for highest grossing games – and nor do they need to. While these mid core and casual games make the bulk of their revenue from IAPs, hyper-casual games mainly monetize through ads, a business model which is sustainable for them due to the huge scale they see in terms of downloads. “Companies like Voodoo (100 million installs in 2017) are a great example of this. While the in-app revenue of their games is relatively low, the scale is great, and through video ads and cross-promotional work, the companies are able to operate a massive volume of business,” said Katkoff.

With such great scale, developers creating multiple hyper-casual titles don’t necessarily need to rely on revenue from IAPs, and for this reason some hyper-casual games don’t even bother to include them.

How to Monetize Hyper-Casual Games

As we’ve pointed out, due to their relatively unsophisticated in-app economies, hyper-casual games rely on ads as their primary form of monetization, so picking the correct ad format is hyper important. Beyond evaluating specific ad units, developers should consider factors like session length and number of sessions per day when designing their ad implementation.

Both elements present opportunities to serve more impressions to users, which in turn drives more revenue. Some top hyper-casual titles with great monetization strategies include Playgendary’s Flip the Gun, Serkan Özyılmaz’s Rise Up, and Voodoo’s Helix Jump.

Rewarded Video

When it comes to monetizing users, in many ways rewarded video is the most rewarding ad format (see what we did there?). In addition to generating more revenue for developers, incorporating rewarded video also increases retention and session length (unlike interstitial and banner ads, which can in some cases have the opposite effect).

While it may be more challenging to incorporate rewarded video in hyper-casual games lacking strong virtual economies, it’s well worth your while to think about creative ways to incorporate the ad format. Developers looking to incorporate more rewarded video can try adding different layers to their games, or providing various valuable rewards such as gems, extra time, extra lives, etc. in order to drive more engagement. A 40% plus engagement rate, and 4 impressions per user per day are good goals to aim for.
[For a more in-depth look at which metrics are important for your in-app ad monetization strategy, you can check out our presentation on that very topic on Slideshare.]

Banners & Interstitials

Even when developers have optimized their rewarded video strategy, they may still see that more than half of their users don’t engage with the ad unit (and even fewer make purchases in the virtual store). This makes interstitials and banner ads a hyper-casual game developers best friend, helping them successfully monetize all their users.

For interstitials there are two main factors to look at. The first is the number of ads shown per second, and the second is the type of interstitial – static, video, playable. It’s also critical to decide if the ad will have a skip button, and if so after how many seconds will it appear? While taking a more aggressive approach – (more impressions per session, including playable and video ads, a ‘skip ad’ button that pops up only after 5 seconds) – will generate higher ARPDAU , it may also simultaneously hurt retention and session length and alienate your users – so approach with caution.

Ultimately it’s all about finding the ‘sweet spot’ that balances user experience and monetization to maximize LTV and ARPU. The best way to find the setup that generates the highest LTV is by A/B testing. For a benchmark, we recommend aiming for 3 impressions per session.

For developers looking to implement an even more sophisticated monetization strategy, it’s also worthwhile looking at building tailored ad implementations for different segments. For example, for users that engage with rewarded video and make purchases in the store, taking a softer – i.e. less aggressive – approach to ads shown makes more sense, since these are high-engagement, likely also high-retention users. For users that generate zero revenue through IAPs or rewarded ads, taking a more aggressive approach can work in order to yield more revenue.

User Level Data

While in hyper-casual games, the vast majority of revenue comes from ads, getting a look at user-level data on ad revenue is just as important as getting it for IAP-focused games. The more important a revenue stream ad monetization becomes, the more important this information will be for both user acquisition and overall monetization activities. In a way, ads are actually very similar to IAPs, in the sense that just as you have ‘whales’ who spend a lot in-app, you can also have ‘ad whales’ – i.e. users who generate significant revenue from engaging heavily with ads. As such, it’s important for app developers to adjust their implementation and strategies based on user-level data on ad engagement and revenue. For example, ironSource’s user ad revenue tool enables developers to see which user segments are not engaging with rewarded video at all, and can therefore be shown more interstitial and banner ads.

Will hyper-casual games mature?

As Katkoff points out, “hyper casual and ad monetization are proving to go hand in hand” – changing the landscape of the monetization game. With so many hyper-casual titles popping up every week, developers may have to begin implementing deeper features in order to stand out from their competition, and it will be interesting to see how they do so within the category’s natural parameters. Hyper-Casual games have opened up a realm of new possibilities in the market and it will be exciting to track the category’s progress over the next year.

Listen to the full gaming podcast .
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Nadav Ashkenazy Talks Ad Monetization at Casual Connect Europe https://www.ironsrc.com/news/nadav-ashkenazy-talks-ad-monetization-casual-connect-europe/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/nadav-ashkenazy-talks-ad-monetization-casual-connect-europe/#respond Sat, 21 Jul 2018 09:34:12 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30785 ironSource VP Nadav Ashkenazy spoke at the most recent Casual Connect Europe conference in London. Discussing everything from the benefits of rewarded video to supercharging game revenue while preserving and even improving user experience, we’ve extracted the highlights of his talk “The Ins and Outs of Ad Monetization” below. Ad Monetization Requires More Attention “Although... Read more »

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ironSource VP Nadav Ashkenazy spoke at the most recent Casual Connect Europe conference in London. Discussing everything from the benefits of rewarded video to supercharging game revenue while preserving and even improving user experience, we’ve extracted the highlights of his talk “The Ins and Outs of Ad Monetization” below.

Ad Monetization Requires More Attention

“Although ad monetization has become a significant source of revenue, the level of sophistication and attention the industry puts towards optimizing ad monetization is far lower compared to IAPs. The industry for IAPs, when it comes to optimizing for revenue, has reached an ideal place in terms of packages, segmentation, pop ups, and more. Yet, for ad monetization, these are examples of things that have been left behind. With a little more attention, you will be able to achieve much more out of your ad monetization strategy.”

Ads from Day 1

“There is a great advantage in having ads implemented in your app from day one. Some publishers prefer to go live without ads, but educating your users to engage with rewarded videos from day one usually generates higher KPIs.”

The relationship between eCPMs and IPMs

“Today, most of the revenue in the industry is generated through installs. Usually, after the first impression a user sees of an an ad, the install rate is much higher than after the sixth impression. On average, out of 1000 first impressions you will have about 6 installs, while for 1000 sixth impressions, you will have only 3 installs. Every additional impression per user is incremental revenue, but it will bring your eCPM a little bit lower as there is less of an install rate for these impressions.”

“If you implement rewarded video at a climax in the game, for example when a player loses a life, your IPM will probably be lower due to the user’s willingness to engage with the ad. Even if they liked the ad, the chance of them deciding to install your game is lower compared to engagement in a cleaner environment, like on the main screen and in places where the user feels more comfortable to engage with different ads.”

The Magic of Rewarded Video Ads

“The eCPMs you get from monetizing rewarded video are usually two or three times (or even more) higher than you get with interstitial ads, banners ads, and native ads. On top of being a great source of revenue, they provide a great user experience.”

“If you are optimizing rewarded video in a sophisticated enough way, it should increase your retention, session length, and may even increase your IAP conversion. This is all under the assumption that the revenue model for most game developers is IAP.”

Rewarded Video Can Convert Non-Paying Users into Paying Users

“Rewarded videos are a way for non-paying users to enjoy your game in a way similar to paying users, who have higher retention and session length. Smart rewarded video implementation ensures that your non-paying users enjoy the premium goods of your game, which in turn will have them play your game for longer. This will help you convert non-paying users into paying users.”

Optimize and Maximize Rewarded Ad Placement

“You should always start by maximizing rewarded ads before moving to other options. Today, especially within the world of hyper-casual, we are seeing game developers produce games without optimizing them for rewarded video. Early on, they focus on earning revenue from interstitial, native, and banner ads that do not have the added benefits of rewarded video. Developers should maximize the potential of rewarded video in their applications or games. Once you’ve optimized your game for rewarded video, then you can add interstitial and banner ads in order to generate even more revenue from your game.”

Rewards should be dynamic and diverse

“Your reward has to be dynamic, in the sense that at level 1 offering 10 coins to the user is good enough, but if you keep the rewards the same all throughout your game, they won’t be as interesting as they were to the user at the beginning. Your rewards should grow in order for you to maintain the same level of engagement that you had when your user was at level 1.”

“Rewarded video should be a very diversified ad unit. That there should be four or five different placements in your game, as well as four or five different reward types in order to answer the needs of all of your users. Some users will engage to get an extra two lives, some will engage to get 10 coins, and others to get another spin. Therefore, as you offer more diverse rewards in order to increase user engagement, you will be able to generate more impressions from your total DAU.”

How to avoid cannibalization

“When you distinguish between the currency in your store and in rewarded videos, the risk of cannibalizing your IAP is much lower. Try and find the right number that generates the highest ARPPU and LTV. If you are in a place where you can add more sophistication to your strategy, consider using segmentation. If you are able to predict very early on in the game that some of your users won’t become paying users, target that group with a higher reward. Always focus on maximizing their ad LTV potential if there is no price and no risk of cannibalizing the IAP.”

Placement is key

“Your rewarded video traffic driver needs to be visible and users need to understand that they can engage with it whenever they want. The main screen is the best place to put a rewarded video traffic driver, as 100% of users end up on that screen. You can also use popups with the option to watch a video and double rewards. You will see that this can increase both awareness and engagement rate.”

“Putting the rewarded video traffic driver in a clean environment on the main screen as opposed to in the climax of the game, enables developers to generate much higher IPMs, and a therefore a much higher eCPM out of the impressions they are serving. For example, the end of a session is a great time to place rewarded videos. The user is relaxed, they have time, and they are willing to engage with an ad in order to double their coins.”

“Remember that the impressions that you’re serving need to serve both the user and the advertiser. The advertiser will only pay you if the user properly engages with the ad. If you crack engagement, you’ll generate much more revenue.”

It’s all about testing and data

“It’s all about testing and data-driven decisions. What works for one game won’t always work for another game. Testing and checking different placements, capping, and rewards, and finding which specific setup generates the highest ARPPU and LTV – is critical to ensure monetization success.”

Click here for the full deck from Nadav’s presentation.

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10 Tips from 10 Industry Leaders on the App Store’s 10th Birthday https://www.ironsrc.com/news/app-store-turns-ten/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/app-store-turns-ten/#respond Mon, 09 Jul 2018 09:01:58 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30647 Once upon a time, exactly a decade ago, Apple launched the App Store . On July 10, 2008 there were a mere 500 apps available for download, but today, according to the most recent figures released by App Annie, there are over 2 million apps that have been downloaded more than 170 billion times from... Read more »

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Once upon a time, exactly a decade ago, Apple launched the App Store . On July 10, 2008 there were a mere 500 apps available for download, but today, according to the most recent figures released by App Annie, there are over 2 million apps that have been downloaded more than 170 billion times from Apple’s store.

Games represent one of the biggest and most popular app categories available in the App Store today, offering everything from new genres like hyper-casual to casual and mid-core. In 2017, games accounted for 31% of App Store downloads, but an astounding 75% of total spend.

Games even featured in Mary Meeker’s 2017 Internet Trends report, where she highlighted the mainstream and evolving nature of the gaming industry. In 1995, a little over a decade before the launch of the App Store, there were a mere 100M interactive gamers, but by 2017, that number grew to an astounding 2.6B, with the accessibility of mobile presumably contributing to the rising popularity and reach of games.

Today, gamers represent a wide demographic segment which covers ages, genders and interest profiles. The average age of a gamer is 35 (which is higher than many people think), 63% of mobile gamers are women, and 23% are over the age of 65.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of Apple’s App Store, we’ve pulled together 10 tips from 10 game industry leaders, people who have not only succeeded in creating great apps users enjoy, but in turning those apps into hugely successful businesses. Continue reading below to hear executives from the companies behind games like Angry Birds, Cookie Jam , Homescapes , Adventure Capitalist, and Cut the Rope weigh in on everything from the importance of fostering a positive office culture in the gaming industry, to the rise of hyper casual, the evolution of ad monetization, and how data and creative come together in UA strategy.

1. Kongregate’s Jeff Gurian: Make sure to close the loop between your marketing and monetization departments.

“While a lot of companies keep monetization and marketing departments siloed, they really do go hand in hand. UA needs to know what the eCPM’s are because that affects what the ARPDAU is for ads, and that affects the LTVs, especially in games that are ad driven. If UA doesn’t know how much the value of ads has increased, then they don’t know how they can increase their bids accordingly.”

Listen to the full podcast here.

2. Mishka Katkoff, Director of Product Management at Rovio and the founder of gaming blog Deconstructor of Fun: Hyper casual games and ad monetization go hand-in-hand.

“If you’re a publisher like Voodoo, you’re essentially seeing a volume of these different [hyper-casual] games and taking the best one based on metrics. It’s a high volume, big-scale prototyping process, so it’s fascinating. Additionally, hyper casual and ad monetization are proving to go hand in hand, as video ads are already starting to define an important part of gameplay.”

Listen to the full podcast here.

3. Warren Woodward, Director of User Acquisition at Nexon: Soft launches are a great time to experiment with creatives, not traffic sources.

“In a soft launch, above all else, we [the UA team] see ourselves as providers of data to the developer and to the product team. We want to learn about the economy in the game and about the product performance. There are a lot of fake users out there and it’s important to choose traffic sources cautiously. For example, if there’s a company that promises ten cent CPI’s, no questions asked, it’s probably too good to be true, and a fake user is worth absolutely nothing in a free-to-play product. If you see CPI’s that are too good to be true, or there’s a company guaranteeing you CPI’s- those are huge red flags that those are probably not real players.”

Listen to the full podcast here.

4. Nir Miretzky, Chairman of GameIS: Constant iteration and improvement is what ensures continued success in mobile gaming.

“Mobile games are constantly iterating and improving because they get real-time updates and real-time reviews, and game companies change their games all the time accordingly. You will never play the same game twice – if you wait for two months it’s not the same game. You can see Candy Crush is still getting new levels after a few years because a lot of people are still playing and paying money. As long as it’s more profitable to still make levels and then to buy the users – it will go on.”

Listen to the full podcast here.

5. Erin O’Brien, Head of Culture at Gram Games: Create a culture of fun so that you can enable the creation of fun.

“Primarily and most importantly, the products of gaming companies are supposed to be fun, engaging and entertaining. So you need to ensure that the people that are making those games are happy and are having fun making those products and being in the company. If they’re not, that’s going to bleed into the products they make and you’re going to end up with games that just aren’t as fun. Take the time to listen to your team because they spend every single day in your office. They’re going to have the best idea of what is best for the company and they’re going to be the people who best understand what is needed and what would work best.”

Listen to the full podcast here.

6. Carissa Gonzalez, Senior Marketing Manager at Pixelberry: How to balance between data and creative in user acquisition.

“A big challenge with this role is that you want to stay on brand but you also want to be data driven, so it’s a challenge to find that balance. The other day I was talking about creative strategy with one of my colleagues, and he said, “If you’re doing UA and you don’t get one complaint at all, you’re not doing your job right. You can’t do UA without taking a deep dive into your numbers. One of the first things I learned early on was to “never trust the data” – if it’s good question it, if it’s bad question it too, if it’s out of trend question it. Whatever is it- always question it.”

Listen to the full podcast here.

7. Artur Grigorjan, Head of Growth at Playgendary: Asia represents the biggest opportunity for game developers to see growth.

“It’s important to approach the Asian market differently than you would at ‘home’. It’s unconventional and sounds counterintuitive, but my advice is that it’s actually better to differentiate your games in the Asian markets, rather than adjusting your content to look more Asian or overhauling the game to match the Asian user. Using this approach, Playrix was able to find our niche in Asia, and now Township is the most successful farm simulation game in China.”

Listen to the full podcast here

8. Jane Anderson, Head of Ad Monetization at Zeptolab: Be aware of cultural events and holidays in every country, they will impact performance.

“You should always be aware of the calendar of holidays in every country. For example, I learnt a lesson when I noticed that on September 1st, when kids went to school, overall performance decreased in China – in fact it decreased tenfold. This impacts developers, because on holidays they spend a lot and advertisers increase their spend. You need to always be aware of what’s coming. Easter is nothing in MENA, for example, but in other countries you need to be ready for it.”

Podcast coming soon!

9. Sally Lu, Senior Director of Ad Monetization at Jam City: SDKs are here to stay.

There are a lot of things than an SDK is able to provide that SDK-less can’t. As a publisher, of course we don’t want to do SDK because it’s such a hassle to go through, there’s a lot of depth cost involved, but an SDK can provide many fancy things, like playable ads, different formats, and different tracking and attribution options [which non-SDK solutions can’t], and this will still be unique to certain SDKs.”

Watch Sally’s interview here.

10. Tatyana Bogatyreva, Head of UA at Gram Games: Involving UA from the very beginning of game design is critical.

“We have ‘Do It Yourself Fridays’ [where] everyone is encouraged to work on a game. UA is involved from the very beginning – once there’s an idea mocked up during these “Do It Yourself Fridays” it becomes a prototype, and during the prototype phase UA comes in and we have to advertise the game with a limited capacity and then give feedback in terms of the funnel metrics, IPM, CPIs etc. Then the game team looks at their retention and that’s when the decision is made whether to progress into the next stage”.

Podcast coming soon!

With each passing day, more and more games are being developed and published in the App Store. Almost 3.5M (or 77%) of the 4.5M apps released on the App Store in 2017 were games, and the number of gamers (and range of available genres) continues to expand, most notably with the recent rise of hyper casual games. As ad monetization continues to prove itself to be a viable and lucrative revenue stream, and with the prospect of even more advertising budgets moving in-app, we can expect to see the mobile game industry continue to grow. In the meanwhile, here’s to another decade, Apple, and may the gaming industry live happily ever after.

Make sure you subscribe to Level Up in order to continue receiving tips from trailblazers in the gaming industry and stay updated on all things related to gaming.

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Pixelberry’s Carissa Gonzalez on The Social Impact of Gaming https://www.ironsrc.com/news/pixelberry-carissa-gonzalez-social-impact-of-gaming/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/pixelberry-carissa-gonzalez-social-impact-of-gaming/#respond Wed, 27 Jun 2018 08:33:36 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30465 In episode 6 of LevelUp Carissa Gonzalez, UA manager at Pixelberry shares her view on how strong game narratives can have a positive impact on people’s lives, discusses what it’s like being a woman in the game industry, and emphasizes the importance of questioning the data when it comes to running effective user acquisition campaigns.... Read more »

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In episode 6 of LevelUp Carissa Gonzalez, UA manager at Pixelberry shares her view on how strong game narratives can have a positive impact on people’s lives, discusses what it’s like being a woman in the game industry, and emphasizes the importance of questioning the data when it comes to running effective user acquisition campaigns.

Read on for edited highlights from Gonzalez’s podcast:

Question the data

“You can’t do UA without taking a deep dive into your numbers. One of the first things I learned early on was to “never trust the data” – if it’s good question it, if it’s bad question it too, if it’s out of trend question it. Whatever is it- always question it.”

Balancing data and creative

“A big challenge with this role is that you want to stay on brand but you also want to be data driven, so it’s a challenge to find that balance. The other day I was talking about creative strategy with one of my colleagues, and he said, “If you’re doing UA and you don’t get one complaint at all, you’re not doing your job right.” I definitely think that finding that balance is a challenge for a lot of UA managers, especially when there is a very specific voice that you want your brand to contain.”

The power of storytelling in games

“One of the main things I love about the gaming industry is the storytelling aspect of it. There’s so many psychological factors that go into game design and all of these different psychological triggers that you place in the UX. Everywhere you look there’s this amazing storytelling opportunity and it’s incredible to see companies in the industry take the time to put value into what they’re developing. In terms of UA specifically, I love that we can track all of our results. That trackability and instant response that allows us to see immediately what kind of impact something had.”

“Pixelberry has designated writing teams that each have specific areas of focus, which is pretty unique, most game companies don’t just have teams of writers. These teams really put time into developing the characters and storylines. These writers aren’t writing for the money. They’re writing because they are actually involved in the storylines and with the characters. And because they’ve put so much detail into creating the characters and storylines, players are able to feel emotionally connected to them as well and make choices based off of what characters they feel an emotional connection to. It’s easy to have superficial titles which are catchy but it’s hard to provide that human aspect to the books, which our writers have been able to give. And that’s one of the strongest parts of the game, the characters in our books are able to connect with people.”

Сontent guides creativity

“Recently we launched High School Story as a book in Choices. That was a really fun one to work on. We’re testing all these different characters and different ways to put them together. You have a world of content to work with and all this extra [material] helps game developers make more creative activity because they have more content to leverage.”

Social impact through stories

“With High School Story Pixelberry did a strong storyline around cyberbullying – something that actual players were experiencing. The game consists of different scenarios where the characters are sent in various ways to manage and deal with these types of situations. The game narrative actually had impact on people’s lives. We had a player who was in a wheelchair and was going to high school and we actually integrated that character of the player into High School Story. One of the player’s friends took a screenshot and sent it to him, saying “wow you’re in the game, you’re in High School Story!” It’s that part [of gaming] that fills you with joy to know that the product that you’re working with not only tells an amazing story, but is also impacting people’s lives. Through these games, people actually get to live their stories out.”

Being a woman in the gaming industry

“I’ve been in scenarios where I’ve been the only girl in a room with 10 other men and you can sometimes see the bickering between them and you. You have to force yourself to put your foot down and be able to back things up with data and numbers and stand your ground. That’s something that you sometimes have to do as a woman in this industry. I’ve gone to meetings where I’m the first person there and the men bypass me to handshake other men, and I know of a lot of guys that sometimes don’t even realize that they are doing these things.

“An important part of this is also to be truthful – if something happens that you don’t feel comfortable with, talk about it. I’ve been lucky enough that both CrowdStar and Pixelberry are companies where you have both strong female leadership and you also have strong male leadership that is inclusive. They don’t treat you any differently.”

“As I’ve grown in my role to a senior and am at a lot of different high-level meetings, I see that there are less and less women the higher you up you go. I took it as my responsibility to push women who were on a team. Women need to be there for other women – to help them and get them through their fears and unconscious obstacles.”

“I think we still need more women in gaming on the client side, because on the supply side there’s actually a lot of women, and a lot of women in the leadership roles. On the actual UA manager side, there’s not that many of us. It’s our responsibility to let people know of [the possibilities in the industry] because I never considered this industry at all. But there can be so much benefit [to having women in the space], so it’s important for us to start spreading the word more.”

Evolution of game marketing

“A lot of companies have gotten smarter about the tools that they provide to advertisers for publisher optimizations. Like receiving IAP payments so that you can optimize automatically, which takes a lot of the load off of UA managers and allows them to focus more on the creative strategy. Whereas before things were done manually, now there’s a lot more strength on the BI side and a lot more support where you can get amazing growth in terms of the data analysis and how down the funnel you can go in your campaigns.”

“There’s still a lot of regulation that is needed in the industry. Especially when you’re only focusing on user acquisition and the data, as well as the veracity of the installs that you’re receiving. So many companies are focusing more on cleaning out their inventory and making sure that there is no fraud. And I love the fact that we’re setting the pace for a lot of initiatives that are being adapted overall in the advertising industry. It will be very interesting to see what’s going to happen next.”

How UA will evolve over the next five years

“For sure playable ads are going to be a bigger part of inventory. It’s interesting to see that some companies are starting to think about how they can integrate VR into their ad units. We’re also going to start seeing more and more UA managers getting a bit more strict on what they’re buying on. Because we have the data available – that means more transparency in the industry. Ultimately we’ll see more knowledgeable UA managers in terms of where they’re doing and what they want to do with their budgets.”

Listen to the full gaming podcast .
Want to learn what goes into making the world’s most popular games? Subscribe to LevelUp to never miss an update.

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Gram Game’s Erin O’Brien on Setting Company Culture as a Business Imperative https://www.ironsrc.com/news/gram-games-erin-obrien-setting-company-culture-business-imperative/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/gram-games-erin-obrien-setting-company-culture-business-imperative/#respond Sun, 24 Jun 2018 08:52:00 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30326 In episode 5 of LevelUp, Erin O’Brien, Head of Culture at Gram Games, shares her insights on how to establish a positive company culture in the gaming industry, gives tips for maintaining culture on a daily basis, and discusses how ultimately, creating a strong company culture leads to building great games. Read on for edited... Read more »

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In episode 5 of LevelUp, Erin O’Brien, Head of Culture at Gram Games, shares her insights on how to establish a positive company culture in the gaming industry, gives tips for maintaining culture on a daily basis, and discusses how ultimately, creating a strong company culture leads to building great games.

Read on for edited highlights from O’Brien’s podcast:

Company culture bleeds through everything

“Gram has always had a wonderful inherent culture – it’s something that bleeds through everything the company does. Our company culture is built around a few things which all support each other- flat structure, open communication, risk-taking and being data-driven. We work to create an environment where people can be themselves and put themselves out there because ultimately that will allow them to try new things and take risks.”

“The data-driven part is also incredibly important to us because in a flat structure you don’t have middle managers telling you what to do. Everything we do is bottom up – the only real kind of authority we have is data and we strive to be data-driven in absolutely everything we do.”

Does company culture help to make better games?

“Our culture is a critical part of the efficiency with which we are able to put out titles. For instance, we don’t work on a project for two years that’s not going to go anywhere. We’re cutting the line on [those projects] early on and aren’t wasting resources and time on things that aren’t going to work. That comes out of honesty, open communication and being straightforward with the people around you. And that, at the end of the day, is very fundamental to the way that we make games.”

How Gram’s company culture produces great games

“Most of our games come from weekly DIY Fridays where people can build tools to expedite our processes, or they can work on a prototype. Anyone on the team can come up with a prototype idea and if they can get a team together to work on it and then get a playable built, we’ll release it to the store and test it. If it meets the KPIs that we’ve set for a successful project, no questions asked it will be put into production. 1010! was our first instance of this. Everything that we make comes in one way or the other out of these DIY Fridays, whether it’s an iteration on a project or a prototype.”

Company culture fosters creativity which in turn leads to great games

“The challenge of maintaining a flat structure is one we’re willing to undertake. In mobile games creativity is so central to pushing the boundaries, to coming up with those products that millions of players around the world are going to play. If you have too much top-down direction, it stifles creativity.”

Culture as a live product

“Expanding our team in London also presented a challenge to company culture. So much of what we did initially was contingent on the one studio, tight-knit familial culture in Istanbul. That’s actually where a lot of the understanding of the organic nature of culture came from, because you can’t just force one studio’s values, activities and workshops on to new people. So rather than tell people what culture is, you have to listen to them. This understanding of culture as a live product actually came out of that challenge. Rather than saying “this is Gram’s culture,” as we’ve expanded to our London studio, we’ve come to listen more than tell.”

“It’s important to underline that company culture is not a set thing, it’s a totally live product – our values are very basic and broad because it’s something very amorphous. It’s constantly shifting and developing and we have to be diligent and maintain an awareness of its relevance because the minute there is a gap, it’s completely defunct. The biggest challenge is allowing culture to grow and shift rather than trying to cling to something that, as you grow, might become irrelevant.”

Make company culture real

“When you say you have an open communication, honest, or family-friendly culture you actually have to put that into action. A big thing on a broader level is maintaining visibility and communication of what everyone is [working on]. One way we do this is by holding dailies in studios every single day. Once a week we have full company check-ins – we have stages in each office and we get every person on every team on the stage to share what they worked on this week. It’s very much about individual recognition – what each person contributed to the company this week and why they did it.”

Creating a culture of fun to enable the creation of fun

“Primarily and most importantly, the products of gaming companies are supposed to be fun, engaging and entertaining. So you need to ensure that the people that are making those games are happy and are having fun making those products and being in the company. If they’re not, that’s going to bleed into the products they make and you’re going to end up with games that just aren’t as fun.”

“In gaming you’re fortunate to be surrounded by people who are hugely passionate about what they do. Therefore, if you create an environment that fundamentally allows for that then you’ve already done a lot of the work to create and maintain a company culture. Take the time to listen to your team because they spend every single day in your office. They’re going to have the best idea of what is best for the company and they’re going to be the people who best understand what is needed and what would work best.”

“As long as you stay true to what people are interested in, that’s going to allow you to have a culture that is authentic and effective. You can’t just sit alone in an office and say “this is what culture is, this is who we are” and then tell people. It’s not going to work if it’s not organic.”

Equal opportunity in the game industry

“At Gram we have a culture where regardless of gender, or where you’re from, you come in and you’re given the opportunity to develop the company, to create new products, to work hard to further Gram in some way and it doesn’t matter who you are. We want to make sure that as much of the industry as possible is like that too, and that ideology is what brought out projects like 2Tons and the 22% Project .

How successful is the gaming industry at building good company cultures?

“Every year there are more and more people who are passionate about [building company culture] and there’s more interest in having culture panels and culture talks. Because we’re a creative industry, especially in mobile, there’s an increasing passion and understanding for the [importance of company culture]. When you have a bunch of creatives you want them to feel their ideas are respected, that they can create things and try things and present them to the team. That’s not just a moral thing – [then] culture becomes a business imperative. That’s how you make games and that’s how you create products and that’s how you develop things, and the industry is now increasingly [aware of] these sorts of things.”

Listen to the full gaming podcast .
Want to learn what goes into making the world’s most popular games? Subscribe to LevelUp to never miss an update.

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ironSource Mobile is GDPR-Ready https://www.ironsrc.com/news/ironsource-mobile-gdpr-ready/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/ironsource-mobile-gdpr-ready/#respond Sun, 24 Jun 2018 08:48:05 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30323 With the GDPR now going into effect, we would like to share the work we have been doing to get ready. In the run-up to Friday, May 25, we assembled a dedicated internal team composed of key personnel from our management, product, R&D, IT, security and HR teams. Our GDPR-readiness process was also overseen by... Read more »

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With the GDPR now going into effect, we would like to share the work we have been doing to get ready. In the run-up to Friday, May 25, we assembled a dedicated internal team composed of key personnel from our management, product, R&D, IT, security and HR teams. Our GDPR-readiness process was also overseen by a dedicated in-house privacy counsel and a leading data protection firm in the EU. This ensures that, beyond May 25, ironSource is prepared for the GDPR and ready to help our wide range of partners to comply.

Our platform restricts personalized advertising

We built our GDPR-readiness plan with our partners and their end users in mind. Therefore, we decided that by default we will not serve personalized advertising in the European Economic Area (“EEA”) or Switzerland, nor do we create any profiles or segments of end users in these countries. Accordingly, in these countries, we also will not allow our corporate affiliates and advertisers to serve personalized advertising. By restricting personalized advertising, we do not need user consent to serve advertising.

Consent API for mediation partners

We understand that some of the mediated ad networks in our mediation platform, do require consent to serve personalized ads. Accordingly, we have a consent API available in the latest version of our SDK that allows publishers to easily pass consent to such third-party mediated ad networks, if they choose to serve personalized ads where the GDPR applies. The consent API documentation is available here.

Privacy notices

Our ad units will include a privacy icon which will allow users to learn more about our data practices. In addition, we require all our publishers to link to our privacy policy from within their privacy policy, so users have the opportunity to read about both our data practices and their rights before downloading an app that has integrated our SDK. You can find our updated privacy policy here.

Data subject requests

We have implemented mechanisms to support deletion and access requests from partners and end users. The following document explains the procedure for submitting data subject requests more fully.

Data protection addendums & transferring data outside of the EU

Under the GDPR, ironSource is classified as a data processor for most of our advertising activities, and is a controller only for a very limited number of additional processing activities (including frequency capping, fraud detection, and basic internal operations related to security and debugging). Accordingly, we have entered into data processing addendums with our publishers and advertisers to comply with the terms of Article 28 of the GDPR. These addendums are now part of our standard agreements, so any new partner gets the necessary addendum by default, and does not need to request it specifically. These addendums also contain Standard Contractual Clauses to allow us and our partners to transfer data outside of the EU to the extent relevant. Please note that when data is transferred to our headquarters, it will be transferred based on the adequacy decision by the European Commission with respect to data transfers to Israel (i.e. a decision that permits transfers to a country outside of the EU without the need for any additional certification or agreement).

Our ongoing process

Being GDPR-ready is not enough. Data protection is an ongoing process, and we expect that new standards and guidelines will continue to emerge in the coming months and years. We keep a close eye on such developments, and work hard to make sure our products, including any new products and features, are designed and updated in accordance with such standards, and with the privacy of users in mind.

 

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Top 20 Gaming Podcasts You Must Listen To https://www.ironsrc.com/news/20-best-gaming-podcasts/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/20-best-gaming-podcasts/#respond Sun, 24 Jun 2018 07:53:10 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=30314 Looking to get your gaming fix by sound instead of sight? We’ve curated some of the best gaming podcasts around to make it easy to find the one that’s most suited to your interests. In the list below, we bring you the best and the brightest in various categories: game development, game design, general gaming,... Read more »

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Looking to get your gaming fix by sound instead of sight? We’ve curated some of the best gaming podcasts around to make it easy to find the one that’s most suited to your interests. In the list below, we bring you the best and the brightest in various categories: game development, game design, general gaming, history of games, and many more. Take a look and choose the game-related topics that are right for you.

Check out our top 20 recommendations for gaming podcasts below:

General Gaming

Giant Bombcast
By Giant Bomb
Description: Probably the most famous gaming podcast out there. It’s run by the top-notch crew of GiantBomb.com and is an absolute must for all gaming fans. It’s been around since 2013, often tops the iTunes Podcast charts, and as of now has about 300 episodes of great content. You also can check out “The Giant Beastcast” (the name being short for Giant Bomb East) – the video game podcast by their New York-based team.
Why we like it: The hosts – senior game critics – discuss the latest game news and new releases, and their off-topic conversation has great comic value. Not only funny, the podcast is also high quality, and the despite the long episode run time, the minutes fly by.
Links:
https://www.giantbomb.com/podcasts/

https://apple.co/2k04gjr

Level Up
By ironSource
Description:  A relatively new podcast, LevelUp is devoted to all things mobile game-related, and covers a wide range of topics from industry trends, to development and design, monetization and marketing, to looking at how you build a strong game company culture, what it’s like to be a woman in gaming, and whether games can be used for good. Interviews are most often with the makers behind some of the most wildly popular games today.
Why we like it:  Because it’s ours and we put our heart into every episode 🙂 If you’re looking for a wide-ranging podcast where you get to hear from companies like Kongregate, Zeptolab, Rovio, Nexon and Gram Games, this podcast is for you.
Links:
https://www.ironsrc.com/level-up/

https://apple.co/2rKsq5O

The Paradox Podcast
By Paradox Interactive
Description:  A podcast about the business of video games, by Paradox Interactive, a Swedish game publisher company. The podcast primarily focuses on the business side of the game industry – covering business decisions, product development, publishing and distribution.
Why we like it:  This is a perfect gaming podcast if you want to learn how the game industry really works. The episodes cover topics like “What is wrong with user reviews?”, “What does it cost to make a video game?”, “Why distribution is cool”, “How to get your game published”, and others.
Links:
https://soundcloud.com/paradoxinteractive

https://apple.co/2wLLVA2

Women on Gaming

What’s Good Games
By What’s Good Games
Description: A relatively new podcast, What’s Good Games is run by 4 female friends with more than 35 years of experience in the game industry combined. They are funny, witty and have some of the best analysis and newsgathering in game podcasting.
Why we like it: What makes this podcast stand out from the crowd is that its four co-hosts are all women. In a male-dominated industry listeners can get a fresh female perspective on all things games. Plus, the hosts are very active on social media, making listeners feel heard and appreciated.
Links:
https://whatsgoodgames.com/

https://apple.co/2Io34B6

Girls on Games – GoGCast
By Girls on Games
Description: This is a podcast of Girls on Games, a video game and geek culture blog operating out of Canada. It discusses everything game-related, tackles the latest news and hottest topics, and interviews people making waves in the industry. Apart from listening to the weekly podcast, you can also check out their video content, as well as watch them live streaming games on Twitch.
Why we like it: Created in early 2011 by two women, Girls on Games has quickly become Montreal’s premiere English news source for game reviews, behind the scenes content, event coverage, editorials and industry spotlights and interviews. “Who run the world? Girls!”
Links:
http://www.girlsongames.ca/

https://apple.co/2k2wj1y

Deep Dive into Game Development

The AIAS Game Maker’s Notebook
By Academy of Interactive Arts & Science
Description: This podcast is produced by The Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences (AIAS), a Los Angeles-based non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the interactive arts. It features a series of in-depth developer-to-developer conversations with renowned and emerging voices, and is hosted by Ted Price, founder and CEO of Insomniac Games.
Why we like it: Despite the fact that it’s relatively new, and only has about 10 episodes, the podcast has already managed to bring in some industry legends, like Ed Boon, co-creator of Mortal Kombat, Brendan Greene aka Playerunknown of PUBG, guys from the Bethesda Game Studios and Guerrilla Games, to name just a few. It’s a fun and informative conversation and a great insight into game making.
Links:
http://www.interactive.org/Interviews/the_game_makers_notebook.asp

https://apple.co/2rLFya8

Game Dev Unchained
By Game School Online
Description: Game industry veterans Brandon Pham and Larry Charles interview pro and indie developers every week to talk jobs, studios, salaries etc. and give listeners an inside look at what it’s like to be a professional game developer.
Why we like it: This podcast is a must for people looking to try to take a crack at game development. The topics range from producing and publishing games, to legal issues, game design, marketing & PR, finding a job, game journalism, and much more. With insightful interviews and behind-the-scenes looks into both the AAA and indie game industries, it’s a well-rounded offering.
Links:
https://www.gamedevunchained.com/

https://apple.co/2IKxTmU

The Debug Log
By thedebuglog.com
Description: A weekly podcast about game development hosted by professional game developers. From games for health care to AAA mobile games, these guys have experienced it all and have the scars to prove it. Aiming to be both entertaining and informative, the show targets developers of all skill levels. Whether you’re just getting started or have several games under your belt, you’re sure to find something of value.
Why we like it: This is not your typical developer podcast. The Debug Log balances in-depth discussions and interviews with a casual sense of humor. They also have the official private Facebook group “The Debug Lounge” where game developers can share experiences, help each other out, and just have fun.
Links:
http://thedebuglog.com/category/podcast/

https://apple.co/2k2BnTS

Interviews with Game Developers

Gamkedo.Community
By Chris DeLeon
Description: This podcast focuses on sharing stories and advice from game developers of all levels – beginners, industry veterans, international etc. Its mission is to convey a broader picture of what’s involved in making games (for AAA developers, indies, game jammers, hobbyists, and more), as well as to cover various sides of the game industry.
Why we like it: Above all, it’s very motivational. If you need a kick to get started making your own games, this is the gaming podcast for you. As every guest comes from a completely different background, you get to hear a range of inspirational stories about unique paths into game development.
Links:
http://gamkedo.community/

https://apple.co/2wLJ7mb

Tone Control – Conversations with game developers
By Idle Thumbs
Description: This is an amazing podcast of the Idle Thumbs network. Here Steve Gaynor of Fullbright (creators of Gone Home and Tacoma) sits down with noteworthy game developers for an in-depth conversation about their career and creative process, and the tricky work of establishing and maintaining a cohesive tone in their games.
Why we like it: Steve Gaynor asks the guests the right questions in order to learn more about their personal perspectives, the specifics of their career paths and game development experiences.
Links:
https://www.idlethumbs.net/tonecontrol

https://apple.co/2L4Yidt

The History of Games

Retronauts
By PodcastOne
Description: This weekly podcast looks into the history of video games, one game at a time. From forgotten black-and-white arcade machines to modern-day remakes, it covers more than 40 years of vintage gaming.
Why we like it: It’s impossible to create a list of best game podcasts and not include this one. Definitely the best retro games podcast around, which is a very fun and thoughtful exploration of gaming history with some amazing stories.
Links:
https://www.podcastone.com/retronauts/

https://apple.co/2InGXL3

Dev Game Club
By Brett Douville and Tim Longo
Description: Two industry veterans and long-time game developers discuss older titles and the impact they had on the games industry, as well as what lessons they can teach game developers today. They also feature guests in the final episodes of each series – usually they get a developer from the original game to talk about how it was built and share their experience.
Why we like it: A good pick for those interested in game development from the perspective of the history of the industry. Also we love the clear and concise format – Dev Game Club looks at older games and explores them in a form similar to the good old book club!
Links:
http://www.devgameclub.com/

https://apple.co/2rL7pao

Looking Beyond the West

8-4 Play
By 8-4, Ltd
Description: For fans of Japanese games, 8-4 Play is a gaming podcast hosted by a team who moved to Japan and started a localization company that translates Japanese games into English in order to bring them to the West. According to the website, “every other week, [listeners can] tune into 8-4 Play for talk about Japan, video games, and Japanese video games, straight from the 8-4 offices in beautiful downtown Tokyo”.
Why we like it: It’s a rare and unique chance to get a sneak peek at the gaming culture in Japan in English. The podcast is a perfect fit for gamers who are already interested in Japan’s gaming scene, or who are looking for something new.
Links:
http://8-4.jp/blog/?lang=en

https://apple.co/2IQG4ho

Chengdu Gaming Federation Podcast
By Chengdu Gaming Federation
Description: This gaming podcast is run by an American independent developer who’s been living in China for ten years, and broadcasts from Chengdu, China (the capital of Sichuan Province). Focused on an exploration of the Chinese game economy, topics include the evolution of the market, the impact of gaming giants Tencent and Netease, Western games in China, and Chinese games abroad.
Why we like it: The Asia-Pacific region represents the largest game market today – China alone has 600 million gamers and is responsible for nearly a quarter of global game revenue (in 2017 China generated $30 billion in sales). For every game developer aspiring to hit the global market it’s essential to know the Chinese market inside-out, and this enjoyable podcast will help you to learn the basics.
Links:
https://www.chengdugaming.com/

https://apple.co/2wOvYJg

Game Design

The Game Design Round Table
By The Game Design Round Table Team
Description: This is a podcast by game designers, for game designers. It focuses on both digital and tabletop gaming and explores various sides of game design. Episodes are chats with prominent game designers sharing their experiences, advice and insights into the industry.
Why we like it: The hosts have decades of experience in digital and tabletop gaming, so the discussion is always rich and informative. If you’re interested in game design you will be able to pick up some good pointers and improve your craft. Luckily, you already have a massive backlog of episodes (almost 200) to sift through!
Links:
http://thegamedesignroundtable.com/

https://apple.co/2L2qrlg

Designer Notes
By Idle Thumbs
Description: According to its site, this is a podcast about “why we make games – as every designer has a different and very personal answer to that question”. The host, founder of Mohawk Games, sits down with noted game designers to find out the answer by examining their careers as a whole.
Why we like it: If you’re more interested in the career side of game development and design, this is a game podcast that will suit your needs, since you’ll hear interviews with industry professionals on their different career paths and philosophies.
Links:
https://www.idlethumbs.net/designernotes

https://apple.co/2rKYWEf

All about Indie Devs

Game Dev’s Quest
By Awesome! Internet Radio
Description: This is a podcast for newbies which chronicles the journey of two beginner game developers in real-time. They set out to acquire the tools and skills to create their own games while trying to embody the phrase, “if we can do it, you can too”. The guys are sharing the games they’re creating during the process here .
Why we like it: Listening to “Game Dev’s Quest” gives you the unique opportunity to learn about the real-life experience of indie developers – their struggles, mistakes and successes.
Links:
http://airpodcast.com/category/gamedevsquest/

https://apple.co/2IpvRoP

Idle Thumbs
By Idle Thumbs
Description: This game podcast is hosted by a crew of San Francisco developers, formerly of such studios as Telltale Games and Double Fine. It was started simply for fun, where random conversations between the presenters were recorded and put on the Internet. It’s evolved into a space where the presenters get to talk about a topic they are passionate about, i.e. games – and the result is highly enjoyable.
Why we like it: The podcast usually focuses on indie titles, since that is what the hosts are personally interested in, but sometimes they also bring a wider variety of games to the table for discussion. Idle Thumbs is a thoughtful podcast that puts a bit more emphasis on design and criticism when analyzing the games. If “Idle Thumbs” clicks with you, you can also check out the podcast “Three Moves Ahead” about war and strategy games, it was created by the same guys.
Links:
https://www.idlethumbs.net/

https://apple.co/2rKAZNR

Beyond Gaming

Laser Time
By Laser Time
Description: This podcast is a must for any pop culture fan. Laser Time discusses an array of topics, ranging from movies, games, music, TV, comics, and more. Hosts who hail from the game industry talk about the last 30 years of pop culture, covering a range of themes from past and present, including Disneyland, the Oscars, South Park, A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Simpsons, Power Rangers, superhero movies – and there are about 300 amazing episodes available to tune in to.
Why we like it: Laser Time provides fascinating new insight into topics you didn’t know could fill a whole podcast, and it approaches each one from the perspective of people who have worked in games for a living. While the content isn’t confined to games, when they do cover them it’s just as interesting if not more.
Links:
http://www.lasertimepodcast.com/category/lasertimepodcast/

https://apple.co/1hlhInN

Super Best Friendcast!
By Super Best Friends Play
Description: Every week, the creators of Super Best Friends Play discuss the best and worst of the game space, geekdom & pop culture.
Why we like it: Four charismatic best friends talk about a wide range of topics that not only cover gaming, but also movies, comics, anime and everything else in between. A well-loved podcast, the chemistry between the guys is great, and the show is both fun and informative. Give it a try – as the hosts put it: “We promise nothing, and deliver less”.
Links:
http://superbestfriendcast.libsyn.com/

https://apple.co/2rMH5wu

Are we missing some of your favourites among gaming podcasts? Feel free to let us know by emailing communications@ironsrc.com or on social media: Twitter, Facebook.

 

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GameIs’ Nir Miretzky on Building Great Game Communities https://www.ironsrc.com/news/levelup-podcast-building-game-communities/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/levelup-podcast-building-game-communities/#respond Thu, 03 May 2018 13:08:38 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=29227 In episode 4 of LevelUp, Chairman of GameIS, Nir Miretzky, covers everything on what it takes to establish and maintain strong game communities and illustrates the trends and challenges in developing mobile games. Read on for edited highlights from Miretzky’s podcast: GameIS: Turning a game community into an industry “GameIs is an association based on... Read more »

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In episode 4 of LevelUp, Chairman of GameIS, Nir Miretzky, covers everything on what it takes to establish and maintain strong game communities and illustrates the trends and challenges in developing mobile games.

Read on for edited highlights from Miretzky’s podcast:

GameIS: Turning a game community into an industry

“GameIs is an association based on volunteers who want Israel to be a good place for the gaming industry. When we started we were just a small community of around 50-70 people who were passionate about games and dreamed about working in the gaming industry.”

“Then around 10 years ago, with [the launch] of the App Store and Facebook, small groups and individuals were able to make their own games, even out of their garage, and immediately some of them became successful. It was a blue ocean of opportunity and as monetization and ad networks developed, the community also continued to grow into a business. Within two-three years, we had hundreds of companies and the [possibility] of becoming an industry emerged.”

“In the beginning people [really] had no experience and there were practically no working professionals, so we wanted to educate people who wanted to join the gaming industry. We put together a lot of conferences, meetups, and ‘game jams’ even before the words ‘meetup’ or ‘game jam’ existed, and this year will actually be our tenth global game jam.”

The game community in Israel

“It’s a very cooperative industry, and we have the whole world to market to. Since it’s not the Israeli customers that are going to move the needle, Israel serves as a good test market. In the beginning people were making games more for their passion and this is maybe why we’re a good community, because everyone is here together for a ‘good cause’. You can see [the cooperation] in all the meetups and the game jams – a CEO for instance will work on a student’s class project, or people will make a successful game and two weeks later those same people will be in a meetup, explaining how they hacked the marketing or how they got featured on iOS. So yes, it’s super cooperative.”

Mobile gaming is becoming an accessible industry

“Most of the game industry today is focused around mobile games since they’re very diverse. You can find people making hard core games for mobile and hyper casual games of course, as well as everything in the middle. [Everything has become] much more feasible.”

“Another good thing that happened to the industry, is that there are new and different marketing options for indie games, and developers can easily reach a bigger audience for much less [money] if they have a good product.”

Constant iteration and improvement of mobile games

“Mobile games are constantly iterating and improving because they get real-time updates and real-time reviews, and game companies change their games all the time accordingly. You will never play the same game twice- if you wait for two months it’s not the same game. You can see Candy Crush is still getting new levels after a few years because a lot of people are still playing and paying money. As long as it’s more profitable to still make levels and then to buy the users, – it will go on.”

Biggest challenge facing casual games: discovery and marketing

“[Especially] regarding casual games, the biggest problem today is discovery and marketing, which are two sides of the same coin. Companies have to put a lot of [money and] effort into making casual games, and then they need to get high profits in order to cover those costs.”
“In general the problem is that you need to be a strong marketer to get a big audience, and it’s very hard because you only really have two big channels [Apple and Google] to work with. So then you need to figure out how to stand out. Even if you have a good product and good people, that’s no promise that you’ll succeed.“
“A huge problem especially in Israel is that the government doesn’t invest in content, and ultimately gaming is content. The technological aspect of gaming is not the main issue – all the tech and code in games are very similar to one another – it’s the content that differs. When you go to the government to ask for a grant they turn you down because they don’t invest in content. They don’t understand the game model.”

How is the game industry is going to evolve over the next years?

“One of the main trends is that gambling companies are acquiring gaming companies and using their knowledge in user acquisition and monetization to make money out of entertainment. For example, Playtika was acquired by Caesars and Aristocrat bought Plarium. Also indie games are taking a bigger part of the gaming culture, which is good. Until a few years ago a better game was the one with better graphics using more computer power and more expensive production resources – not [necessarily] the one with the best idea or the best gameplay.”

Listen to the full gaming podcast .
Want to learn what goes into making the world’s most popular games? Subscribe to LevelUp to never miss an update.

 

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Топ конференций для разработчиков мобильных приложений в 2018 году https://www.ironsrc.com/news/conferences-app-developers-shouldnt-miss-2018-rus/ https://www.ironsrc.com/news/conferences-app-developers-shouldnt-miss-2018-rus/#respond Thu, 03 May 2018 12:57:00 +0000 https://www.ironsrc.com/?p=29206 Сейчас, когда 2018 год идет полным ходом, мы решили сделать краткий обзор самых интересных конференций для разработчиков мобильных приложений и игр, которые еще впереди. В этом году список включает как старые добрые мероприятия прошлых лет, так и несколько новинок, чтобы держать вас в форме. Ведь чем больше конференций, тем больше возможностей учиться, заводить полезные знакомства... Read more »

The post Топ конференций для разработчиков мобильных приложений в 2018 году appeared first on ironSource.

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Сейчас, когда 2018 год идет полным ходом, мы решили сделать краткий обзор самых интересных конференций для разработчиков мобильных приложений и игр, которые еще впереди. В этом году список включает как старые добрые мероприятия прошлых лет, так и несколько новинок, чтобы держать вас в форме. Ведь чем больше конференций, тем больше возможностей учиться, заводить полезные знакомства и вносить свой вклад в комьюнити.

Итак, ниже наш топ конференций, которые нельзя пропустить разработчикам мобильных приложений в 2018 году:

Февраль

 
Mobile World Conference aka #MWC18
Где & когда:  Барселона / 26 февраля – 1 марта
Почему: Это крупнейшее в мире мероприятие мобильной индустрии с лидерами отрасли. Must для всех, кто использует мобильные технологии в своем бизнесе.
Не пропустите: Ключевые спикеры из Федеральной комиссии по связи США, General Electric и другие. И не забудьте зайти на стенд ironSource!
Подробнее: https://www.mobileworldcongress.com/

Март

 
Mobile + Web DevCon
Где & когда:  Сан-Франциско / 1 марта
Почему:  Контент и спикеры предназначены для того, чтобы помочь разработчикам стать лучше. Идеально подходит для мобильных и веб-разработчиков, которые хотят отточить свои навыки и стать экспертами в своей области.
Не пропустите: Mobile + Web DevCon – одна из единственных конференций, объединяющих сессии по iOS, Android, IoT, cross-platform, веб-разработке и UX.
Подробнее: http://mobilewebdevconference.com/

Ad:tech New Delhi
Где & когда:  India / March 8-9
Почему:  Конференция, посвященная исключительно новинкам и тенденциям цифровой экосистемы, Ad:tech New Delhi — это увлекательный контент, обмен опытом и дискуссия о том, как развиваются технологичная и мобильная сферы в Индии и Юго-Восточной Азии.
Не пропустите: Горячие темы, такие как programmatic, аналитика мобильных данных и многое другое. Мы также там будем, поэтому давайте встречаться.
Подробнее: https://newdelhi.ad-tech.com/

SXSW
Где & когда: Остин, Техас / 9 – 18 марта
Почему: Конференция для людей из креативных индустрий, которые заняты поисками next big thing. Широкий спектр тем от кино и развлечений до программирования и прекрасное место для дискуссий. Идеально подходит для разработчиков, которые хотят немного отвлечься, рекламодателей, которые ищут вдохновения, и всех, кто интересуется кино, искусством, технологиями и другими креативными индустриями.
Не пропустите: Треки по VR/AR, игровая выставка и увлекательные сессии, включая «Регулирование AI: как управлять необъяснимым».
Подробнее: https://www.sxsw.com/

Appdevcon
Где & когда: Амстердам / 12 – 16 марта
Почему: Слоган конференции говорит сам за себя — By App Developers, for App Developers. Узнайте, над чем работают и что обсуждают другие разработчики в отрасли.
Не пропустите: Сессии на самые горячие темы, например, блокчейн и голосовое управление.
Подробнее: http://appdevcon.nl/

GDC: Game Developers Conference

Где & Когда: Сан-Франциско / 19 – 23 марта
Почему: GDC — это крупнейшее событие игровой индустрии, 5 дней сессий и спикеры по всем игровым темам. Кому обязательно там быть? Конференция включает в себя понемногу для всех: игровых дизайнеров, программистов, художников, специалистов по аудио, менеджеров по развитию бизнеса, VR/AR-разработчиков, работников студий, исполнительных продюсеров и руководителей, вендоров и спонсоров, кандидатов и рекрутеров. Мы тоже там будем — запланируйте встречу с ironSource на GDC.
Не пропустите: Возможность углубленно изучить игровой дизайн на примере классической Postmortem совместно с создателями одних из самых инновационных и успешных игр нашего времени. Сложно договориться на работе? GDC обо всем позаботились и написали для вас драфт письма «Как убедить босса». Что может быть лучше?
Подробнее: http://www.gdconf.com/

App Promotion Summit (LONDON)

Где & когда: Лондон / 22 марта
Почему: Только один день конференции с разнообразными сессиями по маркетингу приложений и привлечению пользователей для ускорения роста вашего приложения.
Не пропустите: Не получается посетить Лондон в этот раз? Еще один саммит будет в Нью-Йорке в июне, а также в Берлине в декабре 2018 года. #noexcuses.
Подробнее: http://apppromotionsummit.com/LONDON/2018/

Апрель


GMGC Beijing

Где & когда: Пекин, Китай / 2 – 3 апреля
Почему: Эта конференция призвана отточить ваши навыки разработчика. Большое разнообразие сессий, которые помогут вашей игре «взлететь». От разработки до рекламы, не пропустите отличный контент и спикеров по всем игровым темам.
Не пропустите: Примите участие в Indie Pitch Arena, где у компаний есть шанс проинвестировать в новые стартапы, а разработчики могут получить фидбек от экспертов отрасли. Вы также можете забронировать место за столом «быстрых свиданий» между издателями и разработчиками.
Подробнее: http://en.beijing.gmgc.info/

Code Mobile

Где & когда: Честер, Англия / 2 – 5 апреля
Почему: Еще одна конференция «для разработчиков от разработчиков», которые увлекаются разработкой для мобильных устройств.
Не пропустите: Среди спикеров – представители Amazon, IBM, Google, BBC и другие. Также есть письмо «Как убедить своего босса принять участие».
Подробнее: http://www.codemobile.co.uk/

Май


Google I/O

Где & когда: Маунтин-Вью, Калифорния / 8 – 10 мая
Почему: Это Google, что еще нужно? Одна из самых важных конференций разработчиков в мире — обязательное место встречи всех, кто работает в экосистеме Android. Программа этого года доступна по ссылке.
Не пропустите: Мы пока не в курсе, что именно Google будет представлять на конференции в этом году, но делаем ставки на новую версию Android и, возможно, обновления Google Home и Assistant.
Подробнее: https://events.google.com/io/


Microsoft Build

Где & когда: Сиэтл, Вашингтон / 7 – 9 мая
Почему: Дискуссии, live-демо и практические лаборатории с ведущими отраслевыми экспертами в области AI, машинного обучения, смешанной реальности, облаков, данных и т.д., чтобы помочь вам приобрести новые навыки. Эта конференция идеально подходит для разработчиков, инженеров и программистов.
Не пропустите: Выберите свой личный трек — в рамках конференции вы можете гибко создавать свое собственное расписание. Опции присоединиться к демо, deep dives, сессии разной длительности — все направлено на то, чтобы вы учились и могли зарядиться вдохновением.
Подробнее: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/build


Casual Connect

Где & когда: Лондон / 29 – 31 мая
Почему: Учитесь у признанных и будущих лидеров, которые выступят с презентациями по широкому кругу тем игровой индустрии.
Не пропустите: Indie Prize: конкурс, посвященный креативным и инновационным играм с церемонией награждения, а значит, и призами.
Подробнее: http://europe.casualconnect.org/joinus.html

Tech in Asia

Где & когда: Сингапур / 15 – 16 мая
Почему: Конференция направлена исключительно на нетворкинг — «быстрые питч-свидания» сводят лицом к лицу разработчиков с инвесторами, а различные сессии дают участникам возможность заводить знакомства и учиться друг у друга.
Не пропустите: Startup Factory — в рамках настоящей научной ярмарки вы можете подать заявку на стенд и показать свой продукт инвесторам, СМИ и потенциальным клиентам.
Подробнее: https://www.techinasia.com/events/singapore

DevGAMM Moscow

Где & когда: Москва, Россия / 17 – 18 мая
Почему: Слоган конференции «Ваш ключ к игровой индустрии СНГ» говорит сам за себя. Крупнейшая конференция для разработчиков и издателей игр в России, Украине и Беларуси, а также сообщество креативных профессионалов, увлеченных общей целью — делать хорошие игры. Качественный контент на тему разработки игр, низкий порог входа для начинающих разработчиков и серия мероприятий, нацеленных на продуктивный нетворкинг.
Не пропустите: Организаторы каждый год не перестают удивлять огромным разнообразием форматов: Speed Game Dating, Awards с призовым фондом в 20 тысяч долларов, Game Lynch, Showcase, стена вакансий и т.д. Красочное шоу-мюзикл, завершающее конференцию, без сомнения, даст вам большой заряд энергии и вдохновения на создание новых игр.
Подробнее: http://devgamm.com/moscow2018/ru/

Mobile Beach Conference

Где & когда: Одесса, Украина / 19 – 20 мая
Почему: Крупнейшая в Восточной Европе open-air конференция по мобильному маркетингу. В отличие от большинства скучных специализированных ивентов, MBC проходит в формате infotainment: на берегу Чёрного моря участники слушают лекции лидеров индустрии, делятся опытом и заключают сделки.
Не пропустите: В этом году к традиционной мобайл-тематике конференции добавят инновационные темы – видео, VR, AR и AI. По словам организаторов, такой контент будет интересен предпринимателям, С-level руководителям, маркетологам, стартаперам, лидерам индустрии и СЕО компаний.
Подробнее: http://mobilebeach.rocks/ru/

Июнь


Apple Worldwide Developers Conference aka WWDC 18

Где & когда: Сан-Хосе, Калифорния / 4 – 8 июня
Почему: Must-конференция для всех, кто занимается разработкой для iOS или Mac, и место анонса большинства обновлений ПО и новых продуктов.
Не пропустите: Ожидайте обновления четырех основных программных платформ (iOS, macOS, watchOS и tvOS). Помимо ключевых спикеров и традиционных сессий, следите за обновлениями воркшопов и, конечно же, вечеринок.
Подробнее: https://developer.apple.com/wwdc/

Israel Mobile Summit

Где & когда: Тель-Авив, Израиль / 5 июня
Почему: Ключевое мероприятие Израиля по мобильным приложениям и играм и одна из самых известных отраслевых конференций в регионе EMEA. В прошлом году в ней принимали участие спикеры из MoPub, AppsFlyer, Waze, Facebook и т.д., программу этого года можно посмотреть по ссылке.
Не пропустите: Israel Mobile Week, которая проходит до и после саммита с различными мероприятиями для нетворкинга, а также вечеринка в конце конференции, бесплатная для всех участников.
Подробнее: http://www.israelmobilesummit.com/

White Nights St. Petersburg

Где & когда: Санкт-Петербург, Россия / 28 – 29 июня
Почему: Одна из ключевых отраслевых конференций и выставок игровой индустрии в России и СНГ, посвященная разработке и продвижению игр на всех платформах (мобильные, PC, консоли, веб). White Nights — отличная возможность пообщаться с ключевыми людьми индустрии, отследить тренды, представить свои проекты и познакомиться с наиболее актуальными игровыми разработками. Приятным бонусом идут белые ночи в Санкт-Петербурге, которые по-настоящему завораживают.
Не пропустите: Участники White Nights, как правило, только профессионалы мировой игровой индустрии, а это значит, что у каждого разработчика есть возможность представить свой продукт на международном уровне. Кроме того, на конференции традиционно проводится Indie Game Cup — престижный чемпионат для разработчиков игр, где могут принять участие проекты для любых платформ в стадии beta и выше. Кстати, мы также будем на White Nights в этому году, заходите пообщаться с нами.
Подробнее: https://wnconf.com/ru

Июль

 
360|AnDev
Где & когда: Денвер, Колорадо / 19 – 20 июля
Почему: 360|AnDev — это конференция, которая фокусируется на Android-комьюнити и направлена ​​на то, чтобы добавить драйва в индустрию стартапов и технологий. Благодаря сессиям, помогающим прокачать свои навыки, и обмену идеями, эта 2-дневная конференция — отличная возможность учиться и расти для любого участника экосистемы Android.
Не пропустите: Можно подать заявку на стипендию для субсидированного участия в конференции. И если вы были слишком заняты нетворкингом, чтобы присутствовать на той или иной сессии, которую собирались посетить — не волнуйтесь, все выступления записываются, так что практически невозможно что-то пропустить.
Подробнее: https://360andev.com

Август


360 iDev

Где & когда: Денвер, Колорадо / 26 – 29 августа
Почему: 360 iDev является ведущей отраслевой конференцией инди-разработчиков iOS/Mac и служит отличной альтернативой WWDC. Сфокусированная исключительно на комьюнити, она помогает наладить связи между всеми и вся в мире iOS. Хотя программа этого года еще неизвестна, можно предположить, что будет много интересного контента для инди-разработчиков, включая полезные сессии по юридическим вопросам, продажам и развитию бизнеса в дополнение к более традиционным темам по разработке.
Не пропустите: Билеты для студентов и скидки для военнослужащих, чтобы возможность послушать лидеров отрасли и получить классный контент была доступна для всех. Также организаторы обещают крутые сувениры.
Подробнее: http://360idev.com/

Сентябрь


TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2018

Где & когда: Сан-Франциско / 5 – 7 сентября
Почему: Disrupt посвящен исключительно стартап-культуре. Конференция для фаундеров, инвесторов, разработчиков, хакеров и т.д., позволяет вам проникнуть в самое сердце мира хай-тек стартапов. Получите технологичные новости прямо из уст тех, кто способствует изменениям, познакомьтесь с нужными людьми, чтобы реализовать свои карьерные цели, и проявите креативность на виртуальном хакатоне, чтобы разработать решения для насущных проблем в мире.
Не пропустите: The Startup Battlefield, любимый всеми участниками. Конкурс стартапов с денежным призом в размере 50 тысяч долларов — можете быть уверены, что победитель вернется домой, получив внимание всего мирового венчурного сообщества и СМИ.
Подробнее: https://techcrunch.com/event-info/disrupt-sf-2018/

Октябрь


AppSec USA

Где & когда: Сан-Хосе, Калифорния / 8 – 12 октября
Почему: Техническая конференция, посвященная безопасности приложений, включая темы конфиденциальности, безопасности мобильных устройств и многое другое. Это крупнейшая конференция, ориентированная исключительно на безопасность приложений. Программа этого года еще в разработке, поэтому следите за обновлениями.
Не пропустите: В прошлые годы конференция проводила конкурс для хакеров Capture the Flag. Также обратите внимание на Developers Summit, бесплатное мероприятие перед конференцией, состоящее из различных сессий по уязвимостям безопасности.
Подробнее: https://2018.appsecusa.org/
 
Знаете отличную конференцию, которую мы не указали? Расскажите нам, и мы добавим ее в список!

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